Hussam Abdel-Karim Al-Rabai'ah, Ph.D

Associate Professor

Al Ain Campus

+971 3 7024889

hussam.alrabaiah@aau.ac.ae

Biography

 INSTRUCTOR'S BIOGRAPHY

Hussam Alrabaiah   received his  BSc. degree in mathematics  from the Yarmouk University,   Jordan, in 1993, the MSc in Mathematics from al al-Bayt University, Jordan in 1998, and the Ph.D. degree in mathematics from USM, , Malaysia, 2002. In 2002, he joined Zarqa University, Jordan as an assistant professor.  In 2006, he joined Tafila Technical University  where he earned Erasmus Mundus award for postoc position in Granada University. He worked as a research associate in Purdue University back in 2013 and then moved in 2016 to Saudi Arabia to join the department of mathematics at Dammam University.  He is currently an associate Professor at Al Ain University, UAE. His current research interests include fractional calculus, mathematical modeling in environment and finance. He is using MATLAB, SPSS and AQUASEA in his research.

Education

Degree: Doctor of Philosophy Date degree awarded: July – 2002 College/Faculty: School of Mathematical Sciences University: University of Science Malaysia Major: Mathematics Title of Thesis: Mathematical Models for the Aquatic Ecosystems in the Florida

Degree: Master of Mathematics Date degree awarded February/1998 College/Faculty: College of Arts and Science University: AL- al Bayt University, Mafraq, JORDAN Major: Mathematics Title of Thesis: “On K-Element Subsets and Special Elements in Groups”. E

Degree: Bachelor in Mathematics Date degree awarded: June/1993 College/Faculty: College of Science University Al – Yarmouk University, Irbid, JORDAN Major: Mathematics / Computer Science English-based certificate

Research Interests

Ecotoxicology and its modeling Water quality modeling using advanced numerical methods Environmental impact assessment /Environmental planning and management Water Resources System Modeling Surface & Groundwater Flow Simulation Impacts of forest logging on water quality and hydrology Contaminated Site Assessment Organic Pollutants in Marine and Terrestrial Environments Fate and bioaccumulation of Pollutants (Specially PCBs) in aquatic ecosystems

Selected Publications

Abdul-wali Al-ajlouni & Hussam Al-Rabai’ah, Fractional-Calculus Diffusion Equation. Nonlinear Biomedical Physics 2010, 4:3doi:10.1186/1753-4631-4-3.

Koh, H.L., Al-Rabai'ah, H.A., D. DeAngelis, Lee, H.L (2004). Modeling Everglades fish ecology: role of temperature, hydrology and toxicity. GIS and Remote Sensing in Hydrology, Water Resources and Environment. IAHS Publ. 289:328-334

Conferences

Modeling total suspended solids transport from dredging in Saudi coastal areas International conference on numerical and optimization solutions Hassan II University Mohammedia, Morocco 2008 December 17-19.

Multiparty computations, some developments International conference on cryptology UPM, Kuala Lumpur June 2008 Malaysia

Professional Experience

  • Al Ain University of Science and Technology 2018 - Current
  • Dammam University 2016-2018 Department of Mathematics
  • Forestry and Natural Resources Department, Purdue University Indiana, USA 2015 Research Associate
  • PHSI, Purdue University Indiana, USA 2012 2013 Visiting Scholar
  • Ivytech Community College, Indiana, USA 2012 2013 Adjunct Lecturer
  • Tafila Technical University 2006 - Associate Professor - Department of Mathematics
  • Zarqa Univrsity 2002-2006 Assistant Professor Department of Mathematics

Teaching Courses

Calculus, Numerical Methods, Mathematics for Chemist, Introduction to Probability & Statistics, Introduction to SPSS, Numerical Analysis I, Numerical Analysis II, Mathematical Packages, MATLAB Applied Calculus,  Mathematical Modeling, Linear Programming and Game Theory, Actuarial Sciences, ODEs, PDEs, Principles in Applied Mathematics, Integral Transforms, Vector Analysis

0

Oscillation criteria for forced and damped nabla fractional difference equations

Published in: Journal of Computational Analysis and Applications

Jun 20, 2018

/ Hussam Al Rabai'ah

Based on the properties of Riemann–Liouville difference and sum operators, sufficient conditions are established to guarantee the oscillation of solutions for forced and damped nabla fractional difference equations. Numerical examples are presented to show the applicability of the proposed results. We finish the paper by a concluding remark.


0

Theories and analyses thick hyperbolic paraboloidal composite shells

Published in: American Journal of Computational Mathematics

May 13, 2015

/ Hussam Al Rabai'ah

This paper presents the stress resultants of hyperbolic paraboloidal shells using higher order shear deformation theory recently developed by Zannon [1]-[3]. The equilibrium equations of motion use Hamilton’s minimum energy principle for a simply supported cross-ply structure by Zannon (TSDTZ)[2][3]. The results are calculated for orthotropic, two-ply unsymmetrical [90/0] shells. The extensional, bending and coupling stiffness parameters are calculated using MATLAB algorithm for laminated composite hyperbolic paraboloidal shells. A comparison of the present study with other researchers in the literature is given, and is in good agreement.


0

Fractional-calculus diffusion equation

Published in: Nonlinear biomedical physics

Dec 17, 2010

/ Hussam Al Rabai'ah

Sequel to the work on the quantization of nonconservative systems using fractional calculus and quantization of a system with Brownian motion, which aims to consider the dissipation effects in quantum-mechanical description of microscale systems. The canonical quantization of a system represented classically by one-dimensional Fick's law, and the diffusion equation is carried out according to the Dirac method. A suitable Lagrangian, and Hamiltonian, describing the diffusive system, are constructed and the Hamiltonian is transformed to Schrodinger's equation which is solved. An application regarding implementation of the developed mathematical method to the analysis of diffusion, osmosis, which is a biological application of the diffusion process, is carried out. Schrödinger's equation is solved. The plot of the probability function represents clearly the dissipative and drift forces and hence the osmosis, which agrees totally with the macro-scale view, or the classical-version osmosis.


0

Fractional-calculus diffusion equation

Published in: Nonlinear biomedical physics

Dec 13, 2010

Sequel to the work on the quantization of nonconservative systems using fractional calculus and quantization of a system with Brownian motion, which aims to consider the dissipation effects in quantum-mechanical description of microscale systems. The canonical quantization of a system represented classically by one-dimensional Fick's law, and the diffusion equation is carried out according to the Dirac method. A suitable Lagrangian, and Hamiltonian, describing the diffusive system, are constructed and the Hamiltonian is transformed to Schrodinger's equation which is solved. An application regarding implementation of the developed mathematical method to the analysis of diffusion, osmosis, which is a biological application of the diffusion process, is carried out. Schrödinger's equation is solved. The plot of the probability function represents clearly the dissipative and drift forces and hence the osmosis, which agrees totally with the macro-scale view, or the classical-version osmosis.


0

Modeling fish community dynamics in the Florida Everglades: role of temperature variation

Published in: Water science and technology

Nov 01, 2002

/ Hussam Al Rabai'ah

Temperature variation is an important factor in Everglade wetlands ecology. A temperature fluctuation from 17°C to 32°C recorded in the Everglades may have significant impact on fish dynamics. The short life cycles of some of Everglade fishes has rendered this temperature variation to have even more impacts on the ecosystem. Fish population dynamic models, which do not explicitly consider seasonal oscillations in temperature, may fail to describe the details of such a population. Hence, a model for fish in freshwater marshes of the Florida Everglades that explicitly incorporates seasonal temperature variations is developed. The model's main objective is to assess the temporal pattern of fish population and densities through time subject to temperature variations. Fish population is divided into 2 functional groups (FGs) consisting of small fishes; each group is subdivided into 5-day age classes during their life cycles. Many governing sub-modules are set directly or indirectly to be temperature dependent. Growth, fecundity, prey availability, consumption rates and mortality are examples. Several mortality sub-modules are introduced in the model, of which starvation mortality is set to be proportional to the ratio of prey needed to prey available at that particular time step. As part of the calibration process, the model is run for 50 years to ensure that fish densities do not go to extinction, while the simulation period is about 8 years. The model shows that the temperature dependent starvation mortality is an important factor that influences fish population densities. It also shows high fish population densities at some temperature ranges when this consumption need is minimum. Several sensitivity analyses involving variations in temperature terms, food resources and water levels are conducted to ascertain the relative importance of temperature dependence terms.